The 2018 Arnold Newman Prize For New Directions in Photographic Portraiture

DEADLINE EXTENDED TO NOV. 17 @ 11:59 EST
Call for entries has now closed.


Arnold Newman had an insatiable fascination with people and the physical world around him. In his work, he constantly explored the boundaries of portraiture and embodied the spirit of artistic innovation. He was also a passionate teacher–he taught at Maine Media Workshops + College every summer for over 30 years, inspiring hundreds of artists and sharing wisdom like, “we make photographs with our hearts and with our minds.” In honor of Arnold’s legacy as both a photographer and mentor, The Arnold Newman Prize for New Directions in Photographic Portraiture recognizes excellence in a new generation of photographers by awarding $20,000 to a photographer whose work demonstrates a compelling new vision in the genre of portraiture. The prize, the second largest in the United States, is designed to assist the winner in continuing the pursuit of their work and to serve as a launching pad for the next phase of their careers.

Established in 2009 by the Arnold and Augusta Newman Foundation, the prize is generously funded by the Foundation and proudly administered by Maine Media Workshops + College.


HOW TO ENTER

All submissions to the 2018 Arnold Newman Prize for New Directions in Photographic Portraiture must be submitted through the contest platform Submittable. No mail in submissions will be accepted. Please read all terms and conditions before entering.

What to Submit:

  1. The core of your submission is a cohesive group of 12 images that are all a part of a single project, portfolio, or series focused on photographic portraiture
  2. Artist Statement about the series you are submitting (500 word limit)
  3. A brief bio telling us who you are as an artistn (250 word limit)
  4. CV (uploaded in pdf format)
  5. A brief statement about why you would like to win The Arnold Newman Prize and how winning would impact your career and work.

Fee:

There is a $55 fee per submission. All fees are paid through Submittable and are non-refundable.

Prize:

The jurors will select one (1) winner and three (3) finalists for the 2018 Arnold Newman Prize.
The winner will recieve $20,000.
The winner and three finalists will be officially announced and celebrated at an event in New York City in 2018.

Questions? 

Please email contest@mainemedia.edu with any questions you have about the prize.

CLICK HERE TO ENTER

FAQ

Q: What are the image specifications?
A: Images must be uploaded as JPEGs, 1280 pixels on the longest size, less than 2MB total size

Q: What should I name my image files?
A: You don’t have to worry about file names. There are optional fields on Submittable for image titles and image captions.

Q: How many submissions can I enter?
A: You can enter as many submissions as you like. Each submission of 12 images and accompanying documents is $55.

Q: When will I be notified?
A: All entrants will be notified in January 2018 about their status in the prize.

 

 


ARNOLD NEWMAN AND MAINE MEDIA WORKSHOPS

Arnold Newman began his relationship with Maine in the late 1970’s, traveling from his home in New York City each summer to join a host of other renowned photographers in Rockport, who were teaching at the Maine Photographic Workshops, now known as Maine Media Workshops. For Arnold, Maine was a place of inspiration and rejuvenation and the Workshops a place to see old friends, be immersed in photography and share his work and experiences through teaching. He never came to Maine for just his workshop; it was always a longer stay. For more than thirty years, Arnold and his wife Augusta were vital influences among the Workshops community.

I first met Arnold at the Workshops in the summer of 1990. On a hot summer night, I sat in the crowded Union Hall Theater to listen to his lecture, and see the images illustrating his long and extraordinary life as a photographer. It was a lecture he would give every year, and each year, he would begin by asking the young photographers in the audience if they knew of the notable subjects in his photographs – always imploring that we must know our history, telling his audience, “we learn from the past.”

It would be a very long lecture. Arnold loved to tell stories. His stories are pretty hard to beat – how many people can share with you their personal account of photographing the man responsible for curing polio ­ or, every President since Truman? Photographing Otto Frank, the father of Anne Frank, on the day the Anne Frank House opened to the public or­ nearly every artist of note in the 20th century? About spending a day with Picasso? Being with Arnold was like being with a walking, talking history book.

I, like so many others in that crowded Union Hall Theater for Arnold’s slide show, was captivated by the way each image appeared to emerge from the innermost essence of the sitter. These were not ordinary pictures of people. Rather, they evinced the spirits of individuals engaged in their various pursuits, their innermost psyches, and their most honest moments. He has provided the world some of the most memorably significant and truest depictions of important figures in the areas of politics, sciences, and of course, the arts. For many admirers of these subjects, Arnold’s are the quintessential images.

During his extended visits to the Workshops, Arnold would act as an unofficial artist­ in­ residence. Many would enjoy the company of Arnold and Augusta for meals under the dining tent, where Arnold would regale his listeners with yet more stories. After all, he had a lifetime of extraordinary experiences to share! Frequently, Arnold would ask young photographers to come sit with him and would ask to see their work. On more than one occasion, one of those informal portfolio reviews launched the career of a now well­ regarded photographer.

Arnold was always a teacher, when he was in the classroom, delivering a lecture, or even just sharing a meal. To learn from Arnold, was to learn from a great master of craft, a visionary photographer and genuinely learned man. He helped many understand, in a most profound way, what it is to be an artist. I am now a teacher. My students know that I do so love to tell “Arnold” stories, stories of my time working with him ­and to recount his many stories as a way to teach history. To a great extent, it was through these stories that I learned.

The life and work of Arnold Newman have had tremendous impact on the world, on those who know him only through his photographs as well as on those who have had the great fortune to know him personally. He shared with the world his keen observations of the great figures in our history; now, he is a part of that history, and an indelible part of the history of the Workshops.

~ Elizabeth Thomsen Greenberg, Rockport, March 2010

 

We are with:

 

 

Header Image Credit: Portrait of Arnold Newman by Gregory Heisler


Previous Years Winners:

Image Credit: Daniella Zalcman, Newman Prize Winner 2017, Glen Ewenin Gordon’s Residential School
1970-1973 Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1973-1975.