Tell your story by connecting Photography with Structure

Dates:
Oct 19, 2020 - Nov 16, 2020

Levels: Beginner, Intermediate,
Workshop Fee: $645
Class Size: 10 (max)

SOLD OUT!! Email [email protected] to be placed on a wait list.

 NOTE: This class will be held in a live, online format using the Zoom Platform. 
Class meets Mondays 10am-1pm and 2pm-5pm EDT for Five Weeks + One-on-One’s Wednesdays

Join photographer Dawn Surratt as you learn ways to connect photography and structure to tell your story. Develop a concept using photography as a jumping off point and build an object by the end of the week.

Objects can evoke empathy and connect us to memory. They can become talismans or relics. Artists have long been pushing the boundary between photography and other mediums, but it has only begun to achieve full recognition since the 1970’s when the exhibit “Photography into Sculpture” was organized by Peter C. Bunnell at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

This workshop is designed for photographers looking to expand their photographic practice into three dimensional objects by combining photography with a variety of mediums and techniques including transfer, dry and wet medias, digital imagery, box building and bookbinding. Participants are encouraged to bring photographs that they would like to work with as well as any boxes, tins, spools, frames, bottles, or ephemera to incorporate into their creation.

Images:  ©Dawn Surrat

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Instructor: Dawn Surratt

Dawn Surratt earned a B.A. in Studio Arts from the University of North Carolina in Greensboro and a Bachelor and Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Georgia. Her years of work with dying patients in hospice settings is the backbone of her imagery combining photographs with photography based book structures, installations, and objects as visual meditations exploring concepts of grief, transition, healing and spirituality. Her work has been widely shown and is held in private and permanent collections across the United States. She is a 2016 Critical Mass Finalist and a 2018 nominee for the Royal Photography Society’s 100 Heroines.