Learn to make images that are provocative, enigmatic and lyrical. Learn to inspire a psychological and visceral response from your viewer.

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A photograph can be descriptive—it reveals the surface of things.
Learn to delve beneath that thin veneer.
Learn to make images that are provocative, enigmatic, and lyrical.
Learn to inspire a psychological and visceral response from your viewer.

This workshop will provide you with innovative strategies to describe people, places, and histories in unprecedented ways. This course will ask you to reconsider your role as a narrator. Instead, you will develop new methods that transform viewers into active participants in the narrative, and will learn to tell complex stories that are participatory.

By studying your own work and process – and integrating Holly’s approach – you will build a toolkit of skills that is practiced in Maine, but able to be later applied to your own projects anywhere. The learning process will be centered around a storytelling project created through a combination of in-class development and fieldwork. You will receive feedback from your teacher and peers on your current work, and on photographs that are made during the workshop. Holly will describe how research and archival exploration play an important role in effectively describing the places and communities that become the subject of her projects. She will provide you with instruction and tips on how to gain permission for making photographs in new and exciting territories. 

Most importantly, you will leave with a new perspective and a new set of techniques to craft compelling photographic narratives. The workshop will reframe the way you think about visual storytelling.

Images:  ©Holly Lynton

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Instructor: Holly Lynton

Holly Lynton was born in Boulder, Colorado and was raised both there and in New York City. Her photographs focus on understanding rural communities in the United States through their agricultural history, current industry, and ritual. The images she creates underscore the importance of having unmediated experiences with the natural world. In a new project, she examines the intersection of faith, history, and the environment.