Photographing for a Purpose

Photography is knowing more than just when to click the shutter, learn why.

Making good photographs means knowing more than just how to turn on a camera and click the shutter. There are good reasons why one photograph is better than another.

The technical choices before you click the shutter are just a small part off the journey of learning to become a good photographer. There is so much more to photographs than the tools that we use to make them.

This week-long workshop is for young artists who have the desire to dive deeper into the meaning of what makes a good photograph and the possibilities we have before us while we compose the frame and decide when to click. New visual skills are learned through various exercises out in the field and through discussion about your pictures in class. No need to worry about the tools in this workshop, all you need is any camera or phone that produces digital files that can be loaded on a computer. In a busy week of constructive critiques and photographing around Maine, students learn to focus more on the intent behind meaningful photographs and become aware of the environment around them in order to create more beautiful images - images with a purpose.

Prerequisite: As this is a beginning course into the vision of photography, no experience is necessary. 

What you will need: Students should bring a way to make photographs that can be downloaded onto a computer — your phone, point and shoot, or  DSLR - whatever you are comfortable with. We have cameras and accessories available for loan during the workshop if you want to experiment with different lenses or cameras. To take your new pictures home, you will need your laptop, an external disk drive, or jump drive. Have about 32GB of space for storage. Since this is a non-lab course, bring your laptop if you want to work on your images in the evenings. 

About the Young Artists Program: Young Artists’ days are comprised of both classroom and field/location work: lectures and critique, demonstrations, shooting, editing, writing, computer workflow and/or darkroom work, depending on the workshop. All instructors are talented industry professionals as well as experienced educators, and each works with a teaching assistant, providing additional support for their class. The students are busy all day and into the mid-evening hours, attending presentations from visiting master faculty. 

All Young Artists reside at a nearby residence (a motel-style building, with four students to a room, gender specific, and private bath) located 3/4 of a mile from campus. The property is controlled by Maine Media Workshops and is used exclusively by students and their counselors. Students are shuttled to the main campus each morning for breakfast and to begin their day, and are driven back at the end of the each day, following their last class or other scheduled activity. All meals are taken together. Parents can indicate any special dietary needs upon registration. Counselors supervise the students 24 hours a day, and help make group decisions about weekend activities like swimming, bowling, and hiking. Coin laundry facilities are available on campus. A lobster dinner is served (there are other choices) on the last Friday night of each workshop, and all Workshops students gather for an evening presentation of highlights from the week’s work. Parents are welcome to attend and meal tickets may be purchased in the Registration Office.

We recommend students have access to $75 over the one-week period for incidentals, snacks, movies, field trips etc.  

Check-in is on Sunday, between 3 and 6 and departure is on Saturday morning.

 

Tuition Note: includes room and board

Instructors

Jan Rosenbaum

Jan Rosenbaum has been involved in photographic imaging for 40 years. Initially trained as an artist in photography and printmaking, he began teaching at universities and exhibiting widely in the 1970's. While his personal photography centered for many years on a deep investigation of the landscape as a genre for the exploration of the differences between photographic seeing and audience expectations, he maintained an active career as a photojournalist.

After moving to Maine in 1997, he joined the MFA Program at Rockport College/Maine Media College as faculty and MFA Committee Chair. Shortly after he began teaching in the AA and PC programs, as well as summer workshops.

Jan has self-published a book of his personal images, Motel Pools of Lake George: Last Day of Summer, First Day of Fall, 2009. Jan holds a B.F.A. from Wayne State University, an M.F.A. from Cranbrook Academy of Art,  both in photography; an M.S. in Imaging and Photographic Science from Rochester Institute of Technology; and an M.S. in Management of Technology from Polytechnic University of New York (now NYU).

His work is in the collections of the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Cranbrook Museum, The New Museum, the Evanston Art Galley, the Wayne State University Art History Library, and in private collections. Current work can be seen on his web site, janrosenbaum.com. He is represented by the Caldbeck Gallery in Rockland, Maine.